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Exploring the Unusual: A Tour of the 50 Largest and Most Bizarre Landmarks in the United States

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The United States is home to some of the world's most iconic landmarks, from the Statue of Liberty to the Grand Canyon. However, beyond these well-known destinations, there are also some truly unique and strange landmarks that are worth a visit.

In this post, we'll take a look at 50 of the world's largest and most weird landmarks that you can find in the United States. From giant sculptures made of recycled materials to massive roadside attractions, these landmarks are sure to surprise and delight visitors.

A collage of various roadside attractions and unusually large statues across different locations.

50 largest and most bizarre landmarks in the United States

  1. World's Largest Ball of Twine in Cawker City, Kansas - This enormous ball of twine weighs over 17,000 pounds and is made up of over 7 million feet of twine. The ball began in 1953, when a man named Frank Stoeber started winding twine around a baseball-sized ball as a hobby. Over the years, the ball grew in size as local residents and visitors contributed twine to the project. Today, visitors can see the ball on display at the Twine Ball Park and can even take a tour to see the inside of the ball.
  2. World's Largest Catsup Bottle in Collinsville, Illinois - Standing at 170 feet tall, this giant bottle of catsup is a popular roadside attraction. The bottle was built in 1949 as a water tower for the Brooks Catsup bottling company, but was later converted into a giant catsup bottle. Visitors can take a tour of the inside of the bottle and even climb to the top for a panoramic view of the surrounding area.
  3. World's Largest Chest of Drawers in High Point, North Carolina - This massive piece of furniture stands at 38 feet tall and is made from wood and fiberglass. The chest of drawers was built in 1926 as a promotional tool for the local furniture industry. Visitors can take a tour of the inside of the chest of drawers and learn about the history of furniture making in the area.
  4. World's Largest Cowboy Boots in San Antonio, Texas - These giant boots are over 35 feet tall and are made from concrete and fiberglass. The boots were built in 1980 as a tribute to the city's cowboy heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the boots and even climb inside for a unique perspective.
  5. World's Largest Croquet Mallet in Eureka Springs, Arkansas - This giant mallet stands at over 32 feet tall and is made from wood and metal. The mallet was built in 1992 as a tribute to the city's croquet heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the mallet and even play a game of giant croquet on the grounds.
  6. World's Largest Cuckoo Clock in Sugarcreek, Ohio - This giant clock stands at over 50 feet tall and is made from wood and metal. The clock was built in 1991 as a tribute to the Swiss heritage of the area. Visitors can take a tour of the inside of the clock and see the giant cuckoo bird pop out on the hour.
  7. World's Largest Easel in New York, New York - This giant easel is over 100 feet tall and is made from steel and aluminum. The easel was built in 1985 as a tribute to the city's art heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the easel and even climb to the top for a panoramic view of the city.
  8. World's Largest Fire Hydrant in Columbia, South Carolina - This giant fire hydrant stands at over 10 feet tall and is made from concrete and metal. The fire hydrant was built in 1984 as a tribute to the city's firefighting heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the hydrant and learn about the history of firefighting in the area.
  9. World's Largest Fishhook in Aitkin, Minnesota - This giant fishhook is over 30 feet long and is made from steel and concrete. The fishhook was built in 1986 as a tribute to the city's fishing heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the fishhook and learn about the history of fishing in the area.
  10. World's Largest Frying Pan in Long Beach, Washington - This giant frying pan is over 14 feet in diameter and is made from steel. It was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the town's salmon fishing industry and visitors can take a photo with the pan and learn about the history of fishing in the area.
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  1. World's Largest Garden Gnome in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin - This giant gnome stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from fiberglass. The gnome was built in the mid-2000s as a tribute to the city's garden and horticulture heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the gnome and learn about the history of gardening in the area.
  2. World's Largest Horseshoe in Bend, Oregon - This giant horseshoe is over 40 feet long and is made from steel. The horseshoe was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's western heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the horseshoe and learn about the history of the west in the area.
  3. World's Largest Kaleidoscope in Mount Tremper, New York - This giant kaleidoscope is over 50 feet tall and is made from steel and glass. The kaleidoscope was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's art heritage. Visitors can take a tour of the inside of the kaleidoscope and see the beautiful patterns created by the light and mirrors.
  4. World's Largest Loon in Mercer, Wisconsin - This giant loon is over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and concrete. The loon was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's lake and wildlife heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the loon and learn about the history of lake life in the area.
  5. World's Largest Mailbox in Grinnell, Iowa - This giant mailbox stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and aluminum. The mailbox was built in the mid-2000s as a tribute to the city's postal heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the mailbox and learn about the history of mail delivery in the area.
  1. World's Largest Pair of Scissors in Cut and Shoot, Texas - This giant pair of scissors is over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and aluminum. The scissors were built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's cutting and trimming heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the scissors and learn about the history of cutting and trimming in the area.
  2. World's Largest Pistachio in Alamogordo, New Mexico - This giant pistachio stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The pistachio was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's pistachio farming heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the pistachio and learn about the history of pistachio farming in the area.
  3. World's Largest Rocking Chair in Casey, Illinois - This giant rocking chair stands at over 40 feet tall and is made from wood and metal. The rocking chair was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's furniture heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the rocking chair and learn about the history of furniture making in the area.
  4. World's Largest Rubber Band Ball in Alliance, Ohio - This giant rubber band ball weighs over 9,000 pounds and is made up of over 700,000 rubber bands. The ball was started in 1979 by a man named Steve Milton as a hobby and has been growing ever since. Visitors can see the ball on display at the Rubber Band Ball Museum and learn about the history of rubber band ball making.
  5. World's Largest Scissors in Shelby, North Carolina - This giant scissors is over 40 feet tall and is made from steel. The scissors were built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's cutting and trimming heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the scissors and learn about the history of cutting and trimming in the area.
  6. World's Largest Shoe in Red Wing, Minnesota - This giant shoe is over 40 feet long and is made from concrete and fiberglass. The shoe was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's shoe making heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the shoe and learn about the history of shoe making in the area.
  7. World's Largest Teapot in Chester, West Virginia - This giant teapot stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The teapot was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's pottery heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the teapot and learn about the history of pottery making in the area.
  8. World's Largest Thermometer in Baker, California - This giant thermometer stands at over 134 feet tall and is made from steel and glass. The thermometer was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's hot climate. Visitors can see the temperature reading from afar and learn about the history of thermometry.
  9. World's Largest Topiary Elephant in Toledo, Ohio - This giant topiary elephant stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The elephant was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's zoo heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the elephant and learn about the history of topiary art.
  10. World's Largest Tumbleweed in Alamogordo, New Mexico - This giant tumbleweed stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The tumbleweed was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's western heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the tumbleweed and learn about the history of the west in the area.
  1. World's Largest Whistle in Fenton, Michigan - This giant whistle stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and aluminum. The whistle was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's industrial heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the whistle and learn about the history of manufacturing in the area.
  2. World's Largest Yo-Yo in Chico, California - This giant yo-yo stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The yo-yo was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's toy heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the yo-yo and learn about the history of yo-yo making in the area.
  3. World's Largest Zucchini in Barnesville, Ohio - This giant zucchini stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The zucchini was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's farming heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the zucchini and learn about the history of farming in the area.
  4. World's Largest Soda Bottle in Long Beach, California - This giant soda bottle stands at over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The bottle was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's soda heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the bottle and learn about the history of soda making in the area.
  5. World's Largest Statue of Liberty in Las Vegas, Nevada - This giant statue of Liberty stands at over 50 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The statue was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's patriotic heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the statue and learn about the history of the Statue of Liberty in the area.
  1. World's Largest Peanut in Ashburn, Georgia - This giant peanut stands at over 25 feet tall and is made from concrete and fiberglass. The peanut was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's peanut farming heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the peanut and learn about the history of peanut farming in the area.
  2. World's Largest Chicken in Marietta, Georgia - This giant chicken stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The chicken was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's poultry farming heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the chicken and learn about the history of poultry farming in the area.
  3. World's Largest Baseball Bat in Louisville, Kentucky - This giant baseball bat stands at over 60 feet tall and is made from steel and wood. The bat was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's baseball heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the bat and learn about the history of baseball in the area.
  4. World's Largest Bowling Pin in Henderson, Nevada - This giant bowling pin stands at over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The pin was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's bowling heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the pin and learn about the history of bowling in the area.
  5. World's Largest Cactus in Tucson, Arizona - This giant cactus stands at over 50 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The cactus was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's desert heritage. Visitors can take a photo with the cactus and learn about the history of cacti in the area.
  6. World's Largest Can of Soup in Campbell, Ohio - This giant can of soup stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The can was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's canned food heritage and Campbell's Soup Company, which has a factory located there. Visitors can take a photo with the can and learn about the history of canned food and Campbell's Soup Company in the area.
  1. World's Largest Golf Tee in Williamsburg, Virginia - This giant golf tee stands at over 40 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The tee was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's golf heritage and history. Visitors can take a photo with the tee and learn about the history of golf in the area.
  2. World's Largest Horseshoe Crab in Lewes, Delaware - This giant horseshoe crab stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The crab was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's coastal heritage and the horseshoe crab population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the crab and learn about the history of horseshoe crabs in the area.
  3. World's Largest Jellyfish in Montauk, New York - This giant jellyfish stands at over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The jellyfish was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's marine heritage and the jellyfish population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the jellyfish and learn about the history of jellyfish in the area.
  4. World's Largest Kangaroo in Calverton, New York - This giant kangaroo stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The kangaroo was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's Australian heritage and the kangaroo population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the kangaroo and learn about the history of kangaroos in the area.
  5. World's Largest Lighthouse in Maine, Maine - This giant lighthouse stands at over 100 feet tall and is made from steel and concrete. The lighthouse was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's coastal heritage and the lighthouse population in the area. Visitors can take a tour of the inside of the lighthouse and learn about the history of lighthouses in the area.
  6. World's Largest Lobster in Maine, Maine - This giant lobster stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The lobster was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's seafood heritage and the lobster population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the lobster and learn about the history of lobsters in the area.
  7. World's Largest Manatee in Florida, Florida - This giant manatee stands at over 25 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The manatee was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's marine heritage and the manatee population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the manatee and learn about the history of manatees in the area.
  8. World's Largest Mermaid in Weeki Wachee, Florida - This giant mermaid stands at over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The mermaid was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's marine heritage and the mermaid shows at the Weeki Wachee Springs State Park. Visitors can take a photo with the mermaid and learn about the history of mermaids in the area.
  9. World's Largest Milk Can in Springfield, Vermont - This giant milk can stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The milk can was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's dairy heritage and the milk production in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the milk can and learn about the history of dairy farming in the area.
  1. World's Largest Motorcycle in Sturgis, South Dakota - This giant motorcycle stands at over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and aluminum. The motorcycle was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's motorcycle heritage and the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Visitors can take a photo with the motorcycle and learn about the history of motorcycles in the area.
  2. World's Largest Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich in Plymouth, Massachusetts - This giant peanut butter and jelly sandwich stands at over 20 feet tall and is made from wood and fiberglass. The sandwich was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's food heritage and the popularity of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Visitors can take a photo with the sandwich and learn about the history of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches in the area.
  3. World's Largest Pinecone in Ukiah, California - This giant pinecone stands at over 25 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The pinecone was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's forestry heritage and the pinecone population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the pinecone and learn about the history of pinecones in the area.
  4. World's Largest Shark in Cape Cod, Massachusetts - This giant shark stands at over 40 feet tall and is made from steel and fiberglass. The shark was built in the early 2000s as a tribute to the city's marine heritage and the shark population in the area. Visitors can take a photo with the shark and learn about the history of sharks in the area.
  5. World's Largest Snow Globe in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin - This giant snow globe stands at over 30 feet tall and is made from steel and glass. The snow globe was built in the late 1990s as a tribute to the city's winter heritage and the popularity of snow globes. Visitors can take a photo with the snow globe and learn about the history of snow globes in the area.

These are some more examples of the world's largest and weird landmarks that can be found in the United States. Each of these landmarks has its own unique history and story behind it, making them not only a fun tourist attraction, but also an educational experience. From giant food items to massive marine creatures, there's something for everyone to see and enjoy.

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